Date:
February 10, 2021

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Verifiable dismantlement of nuclear weapons will be at the core of future arms control agreements that aim to eliminate nuclear weapons. How can these weapons be dismantled verifiably? How can all countries, those with and without nuclear weapons, have confidence that dismantlement has taken place? How can assurance and confidence in the process be achieved without sharing sensitive information that could contribute to proliferation of nuclear weapons? Is this even possible?

The IPNDV has concluded – yes, it is possible. An interactive graphic featured on the Partnership’s website brings this monitoring and verification process to life. Although there are challenges, applicable technologies and inspection procedures exist that should make multilateral monitored nuclear dismantlement possible, while successfully managing safety, security, non-proliferation, and classification concerns.

This graphic allows you to explore and learn about the 14-step model developed by the IPNDV, beginning with the removal of a nuclear weapon from its delivery system and ending with the disposition of its separate components. This interactive tool highlights applicable technologies and procedures that could be used at each step to achieve specific monitoring and inspection objectives, goals, and tasks.

Developed originally in 2017 at the end of the IPNDV’s first phase of work, the interactive graphic has been updated to reflect the Partnership’s work since then, as analytical and practical work progressed throughout Phase II and into Phase III. Visitors also will have more control over how they explore the interactive with a new navigation system. Photos from IPNDV exercises and technology demonstrations also have been added to the interactive, illustrating how the partners have tested monitoring and verification tools and procedures –underscoring how the IPNDV continues to progress from “paper to practice.”

Take a closer look and explore the step-by-step interactive here.

This interactive was developed with generous financial support from the Government of Canada.